migration

Friday, December 18, 2020

The Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2020 is a baseline assessment of the implementation of the Global Compact for Migration (GCM) in Asia and the Pacific. It will inform the Asia-Pacific Regional Review of GCM Implementation, to be held from 10 to 12 March 2021.

To access full report, please visit APMR 2020.

Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2020

18 Dec 2020
Friday, December 18, 2020

The observance of International Migrants Day 2020 in Asia and the Pacific is co-organized by ESCAP, the Regional United Nations Network on Migration and the Embassy of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh. It will feature the launch of the Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2020, the first comprehensive UN system-wide assessment of the implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in Asia and the Pacific.

Dec
18
2020
18 Dec 2020
Meetings, Seminars and Workshops
Bangkok, Thailand, Asia Pacific
By invitation only
Thursday, December 3, 2020

Over the past three months, the joint-agency Pacific Climate Change Migration and Human Security (PCCMHS) programme has hosted a series of six regional policy dialogues with senior government officials from across the Pacific region. In coordination with the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the discussions provided an opportunity for Pacific countries to review the human security implications of climate change and mobility, discuss relevant global, regional and national initiatives and examine different options for the region to ensure the protection of climate related migrants.

The sixth and final webinar concluded in November. Discussions on climate mobility will gain further momentum in 2021 as the PCCMHS programme looks to support national and regional consultations in the Pacific region. The PCCMHS programme will review the outcomes of these consultations face to face in Suva to inform a regional framework that respects national policies, strategies and narratives while promoting recognition and the legal protection of migrants and displaced persons particularly in the context of climate change.

Read full press release: https://bit.ly/3ofelbn

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Government Officials from around the Pacific region started a series of virtual policy discussions this week (16/09) that will examine how climate change and disasters will affect mobility trends in the Pacific Islands.

The regional policy dialogue is facilitated by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), as part of the joint-UN agency programme on Pacific Climate Change Migration and Human Security (PCCMHS) programme.

The programme is implemented by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) as the lead agency, ESCAP, International Labour Organization (ILO), the Office for the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), the Platform on Disaster Displacement (PDD) and Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS).

The programme is funded by the UN Trust Fund for Human Security and the New Zealand Aid Programme.

Though Pacific countries are among the smallest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, the region is highly exposed to its harshest impacts. Pacific communities are affected by a range of sudden-onset and slow-onset hazards that are either made more intense, accelerated by, or caused by climate change. This contributes to voluntary migration flows but at the same time, could increase displacement both internally and across borders. In order to adapt to the impacts of climate change, some governments are already supporting the movement of climate change-affected communities.

Over the next three months, Pacific Governments from across the region will have six online sessions that will look closely into some of the issues that arise from climate change related migration, displacement and relocation so that this complex nexus becomes better understood within the region.

Session 1: Introductory Session
Wednesday, 16 September 2020
12:00-14:00 (Fiji Time)

Session 2: Country Perspectives I
Wednesday, 30 September 2020
12:00-14:00 (Fiji Time)

Session 3: Country Perspectives II
Wednesday, 14 October 2020
12:00-14:00 (Fiji Time)

Session 4: Regional and Global Context
Wednesday, 28 October 2020
12:00-14:00 (Fiji Time)

Session 5: Legal and Policy Gaps
Wednesday, 11 November 2020
9:00-12:00 (Fiji Time)

Session 6: Framing a Pacific Regional Response
Wednesday, 25 November 2020
12:00-14:00 (Fiji Time)

Mar
10
2021
10 Mar 2021 to 12 Mar 2021
Meetings, Seminars and Workshops
Bangkok, Thailand
By invitation only

Asia-Pacific Regional Review of Implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration

International migration is an important multidimensional reality of major relevance for sustainable development to countries of origin, transit and destination. In 2019, there were about 65 million immigrants residing in Asia and the Pacific, 71 per cent of whom were from other countries within the region, and over 106 million emigrants from the region. Women make up 51 per cent of immigrants but only 46 per cent of emigrants (ESCAP, 2019).[1] Regional migration movements include a large percentage of people in search of better jobs and livelihoods. In addition, migration in the region is driven by a range of political, social and environmental factors, facilitated by networks and increasing levels of connectivity.

Through work, consumption, and taxes, migrants make significant contributions to sustainable development in developing countries of destination, and they build bridges between countries of origin and destination. In 2019, migrant workers sent over $327 billion in remittances to Asian and Pacific countries, over ten times the amount received as official development assistance in that year (World Bank, 2019).[2] Migration can also be empowering for migrants themselves, enabling them to learn new skills and broadening their horizons. Yet at the same time, many migrants in the region are faced with abuse, violence and exploitation throughout their migration experience which can have devastating impacts on individuals and community and also limit their ability to contribute to sustainable development in the Asia-Pacific region.

In this context, and pursuant to General Assembly resolutions 73/195 and 73/326, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the Regional United Nations Network on Migration for Asia and the Pacific of which ESCAP is a member, are organizing the Asia-Pacific Regional Review of Implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. The meeting will be held from 10 to 12 March 2021 in Bangkok, Thailand, at the United Nations Conference Center, subject to prevailing circumstances.

Additional information on the meeting is forthcoming.

__________________
[1] ESCAP, 2019: ESCAP Population Data Sheet 2019.

[2] World Bank, 2019: World Bank staff calculations based on data from IMF Balance of Payment Statistics database and data releases from central banks, national statistical agencies, and World Bank country desks. See Migration and Development Brief 28, Appendix A for details. October 2019 update.

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

When 164 United Nations member States adopted the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration (the Marrakech Compact on Migration) on 10 December last year, I read on social media that they had decided to give up control over migration to the UN.

So did that mean, as someone who works on migration in the UN, I could pick and choose who gets to go where?

To continue reading the blog, please visit: Marrakech Compact on Migration: Myths and Realities

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

ESCAP, in partnership with the United Nations Statistics Division, DESA and the Population Division, DESA, is organizing the Regional workshop on Strengthening the collection and use of international migration data in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development at the United Nations Conference Centre in Bangkok from 5-8 February 2019.

The Workshop will build country capacities to produce and analyse comprehensive national migration data that meet international standards. It will enhance understanding of the use and limitations of migration data for policy purposes and the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Participants from national statistical offices and line ministries from 11 countries across the region will participate.

Partners in the workshop will include the International Organization for Migration, the International Labour Organization, Eurostat, the United States Census Bureau and UNICEF.

For more information, please see: https://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic-social/meetings/2019/bangkok-int...

Pages